What's New For 2.6.0-test3 on i386

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array(2583) { [0]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["entry_type"]=> string(4) "MENU" ["text"]=> string(26) "Linux Kernel Configuration" ["name"]=> NULL ["value"]=> NULL ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> NULL ["level"]=> string(1) "0" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [1]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(1) "2" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(3) "X86" ["name"]=> string(3) "X86" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(231) " This is Linux's home port. Linux was originally native to the Intel 386, and runs on all the later x86 processors including the Intel 486, 586, Pentiums, and various instruction-set-compatible chips by AMD, Cyrix, and others. " } [2]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(1) "3" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(3) "MMU" ["name"]=> string(3) "MMU" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [3]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(1) "4" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(4) "SBUS" ["name"]=> string(4) "SBUS" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [4]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(1) "5" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(5) "UID16" ["name"]=> string(5) "UID16" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [5]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(1) "6" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(15) "GENERIC_ISA_DMA" ["name"]=> string(15) "GENERIC_ISA_DMA" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [6]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(1) "7" ["entry_type"]=> string(4) "MENU" ["text"]=> string(27) "Code maturity level options" ["name"]=> NULL ["value"]=> NULL ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> NULL ["level"]=> string(1) "0" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [7]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(1) "8" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(53) "Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers" ["name"]=> string(12) "EXPERIMENTAL" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(1587) " Some of the various things that Linux supports (such as network drivers, file systems, network protocols, etc.) can be in a state of development where the functionality, stability, or the level of testing is not yet high enough for general use. This is usually known as the "alpha-test" phase among developers. If a feature is currently in alpha-test, then the developers usually discourage uninformed widespread use of this feature by the general public to avoid "Why doesn't this work?" type mail messages. However, active testing and use of these systems is welcomed. Just be aware that it may not meet the normal level of reliability or it may fail to work in some special cases. Detailed bug reports from people familiar with the kernel internals are usually welcomed by the developers (before submitting bug reports, please read the documents , , , , and in the kernel source). This option will also make obsoleted drivers available. These are drivers that have been replaced by something else, and/or are scheduled to be removed in a future kernel release. Unless you intend to help test and develop a feature or driver that falls into this category, or you have a situation that requires using these features, you should probably say N here, which will cause the configurator to present you with fewer choices. If you say Y here, you will be offered the choice of using features or drivers that are currently considered to be in the alpha-test phase. " } [8]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(1) "9" ["entry_type"]=> string(4) "MENU" ["text"]=> string(13) "General setup" ["name"]=> NULL ["value"]=> NULL ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> NULL ["level"]=> string(1) "0" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [9]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "10" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(38) "Support for paging of anonymous memory" ["name"]=> string(4) "SWAP" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(234) " This option allows you to choose whether you want to have support for socalled swap devices or swap files in your kernel that are used to provide more virtual memory than the actual RAM present in your computer. If unsure say Y. " } [10]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "11" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(12) "System V IPC" ["name"]=> string(7) "SYSVIPC" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(597) " Inter Process Communication is a suite of library functions and system calls which let processes (running programs) synchronize and exchange information. It is generally considered to be a good thing, and some programs won't run unless you say Y here. In particular, if you want to run the DOS emulator dosemu under Linux (read the DOSEMU-HOWTO, available from ), you'll need to say Y here. You can find documentation about IPC with "info ipc" and also in section 6.4 of the Linux Programmer's Guide, available from . " } [11]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "12" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(22) "BSD Process Accounting" ["name"]=> string(16) "BSD_PROCESS_ACCT" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(578) " If you say Y here, a user level program will be able to instruct the kernel (via a special system call) to write process accounting information to a file: whenever a process exits, information about that process will be appended to the file by the kernel. The information includes things such as creation time, owning user, command name, memory usage, controlling terminal etc. (the complete list is in the struct acct in ). It is up to the user level program to do useful things with this information. This is generally a good idea, so say Y. " } [12]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "13" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(14) "Sysctl support" ["name"]=> string(6) "SYSCTL" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(659) " The sysctl interface provides a means of dynamically changing certain kernel parameters and variables on the fly without requiring a recompile of the kernel or reboot of the system. The primary interface consists of a system call, but if you say Y to "/proc file system support", a tree of modifiable sysctl entries will be generated beneath the /proc/sys directory. They are explained in the files in . Note that enabling this option will enlarge the kernel by at least 8 KB. As it is generally a good thing, you should say Y here unless building a kernel for install/rescue disks or your system is very limited in memory. " } [13]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "14" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "STRING" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(13) "LOG_BUF_SHIFT" ["value"]=> string(2) "15" ["type"]=> string(6) "string" ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(48) "Kernel log buffer size (16 => 64KB, 17 => 128KB)" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [14]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "15" ["entry_type"]=> string(4) "MENU" ["text"]=> string(45) "Remove kernel features (for embedded systems)" ["name"]=> NULL ["value"]=> NULL ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> NULL ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [15]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "16" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(45) "Remove kernel features (for embedded systems)" ["name"]=> string(8) "EMBEDDED" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(218) " This option allows certain base kernel features to be removed from the build. This is for specialized environments which can tolerate a "non-standard" kernel. Only use this if you really know what you are doing. " } [16]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "17" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(40) "Load all symbols for debugging/kksymoops" ["name"]=> string(8) "KALLSYMS" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(205) " Say Y here to let the kernel print out symbolic crash information and symbolic stack backtraces. This increases the size of the kernel somewhat, as all symbols have to be loaded into the kernel image. " } [17]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "18" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(20) "Enable futex support" ["name"]=> string(5) "FUTEX" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(176) " Disabling this option will cause the kernel to be built without support for "fast userspace mutexes". The resulting kernel may not run glibc-based applications correctly. " } [18]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "19" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(24) "Enable eventpoll support" ["name"]=> string(5) "EPOLL" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(110) " Disabling this option will cause the kernel to be built without support for epoll family of system calls. " } [19]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "20" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(26) "Anticipatory I/O scheduler" ["name"]=> string(10) "IOSCHED_AS" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [20]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "21" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(22) "Deadline I/O scheduler" ["name"]=> string(16) "IOSCHED_DEADLINE" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [21]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "22" ["entry_type"]=> string(4) "MENU" ["text"]=> string(23) "Loadable module support" ["name"]=> NULL ["value"]=> NULL ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> NULL ["level"]=> string(1) "0" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [22]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "23" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(30) "Enable loadable module support" ["name"]=> string(7) "MODULES" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(552) " Kernel modules are small pieces of compiled code which can be inserted in or removed from the running kernel, using the programs insmod and rmmod. This is described in the file , including the fact that you have to say "make modules" in order to compile the modules that you chose during kernel configuration. Modules can be device drivers, file systems, binary executable formats, and so on. If you think that you may want to make use of modules with this kernel in the future, then say Y here. If unsure, say Y. " } [23]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "24" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(16) "Module unloading" ["name"]=> string(13) "MODULE_UNLOAD" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(195) " Without this option you will not be able to unload any modules (note that some modules may not be unloadable anyway), which makes your kernel slightly smaller and simpler. If unsure, say Y. " } [24]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "25" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(23) "Forced module unloading" ["name"]=> string(19) "MODULE_FORCE_UNLOAD" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(2) "15" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(285) " This option allows you to force a module to unload, even if the kernel believes it is unsafe: the kernel will remove the module without waiting for anyone to stop using it (using the -f option to rmmod). This is mainly for kernel developers and desperate users. If unsure, say N. " } [25]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "26" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(16) "OBSOLETE_MODPARM" ["name"]=> string(16) "OBSOLETE_MODPARM" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(149) " You need this option to use module parameters on modules which have not been converted to the new module parameter system yet. If unsure, say Y. " } [26]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "27" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(40) "Module versioning support (EXPERIMENTAL)" ["name"]=> string(11) "MODVERSIONS" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(370) " Usually, you have to use modules compiled with your kernel. Saying Y here makes it sometimes possible to use modules compiled for different kernels, by adding enough information to the modules to (hopefully) spot any changes which would make them incompatible with the kernel you are running. If you say Y here, you will need a copy of genksyms. If unsure, say N. " } [27]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "28" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(20) "Kernel module loader" ["name"]=> string(4) "KMOD" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(565) " Normally when you have selected some drivers and/or file systems to be created as loadable modules, you also have the responsibility to load the corresponding modules (using the programs insmod or modprobe) before you can use them. If you say Y here however, the kernel will be able to load modules for itself: when a part of the kernel needs a module, it runs modprobe with the appropriate arguments, thereby loading the module if it is available. (This is a replacement for kerneld.) Say Y here and read about configuring it in . " } [28]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "29" ["entry_type"]=> string(4) "MENU" ["text"]=> string(27) "Processor type and features" ["name"]=> NULL ["value"]=> NULL ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> NULL ["level"]=> string(1) "0" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [29]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "30" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(6) "X86_PC" ["value"]=> string(1) "2" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(13) "PC-compatible" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [30]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "31" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(11) "X86_VOYAGER" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(13) "Voyager (NCR)" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [31]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "32" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(9) "X86_NUMAQ" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(19) "NUMAQ (IBM/Sequent)" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [32]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "33" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(10) "X86_SUMMIT" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(21) "Summit/EXA (IBM x440)" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [33]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "34" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(10) "X86_BIGSMP" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(60) "Support for other sub-arch SMP systems with more than 8 CPUs" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [34]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "35" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(9) "X86_VISWS" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(32) "SGI 320/540 (Visual Workstation)" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [35]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "36" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(15) "X86_GENERICARCH" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(46) "Generic architecture (Summit, bigsmp, default)" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [36]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "37" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(10) "X86_ES7000" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(37) "Support for Unisys ES7000 IA32 series" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [37]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "38" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(9) "ACPI_SRAT" ["name"]=> string(9) "ACPI_SRAT" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [38]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "39" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(17) "X86_CYCLONE_TIMER" ["name"]=> string(17) "X86_CYCLONE_TIMER" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [39]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "40" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(21) "ES7000_CLUSTERED_APIC" ["name"]=> string(21) "ES7000_CLUSTERED_APIC" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [40]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "41" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(4) "M386" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(3) "386" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [41]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "42" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(4) "M486" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(3) "486" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [42]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "43" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(4) "M586" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(23) "586/K5/5x86/6x86/6x86MX" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [43]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "44" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(7) "M586TSC" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(15) "Pentium-Classic" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [44]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "45" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(7) "M586MMX" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(11) "Pentium-MMX" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [45]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "46" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(4) "M686" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(11) "Pentium-Pro" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [46]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "47" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(10) "MPENTIUMII" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(34) "Pentium-II/Celeron(pre-Coppermine)" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [47]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "48" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(11) "MPENTIUMIII" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(48) "Pentium-III/Celeron(Coppermine)/Pentium-III Xeon" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [48]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "49" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(9) "MPENTIUM4" ["value"]=> string(1) "2" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(32) "Pentium-4/Celeron(P4-based)/Xeon" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [49]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "50" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(3) "MK6" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(15) "K6/K6-II/K6-III" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [50]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "51" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(3) "MK7" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(15) "Athlon/Duron/K7" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [51]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "52" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(3) "MK8" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(26) "Opteron/Athlon64/Hammer/K8" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [52]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "53" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(5) "MELAN" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(4) "Elan" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [53]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "54" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(7) "MCRUSOE" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(6) "Crusoe" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [54]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "55" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(10) "MWINCHIPC6" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(10) "Winchip-C6" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [55]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "56" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(9) "MWINCHIP2" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(9) "Winchip-2" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [56]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "57" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(10) "MWINCHIP3D" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(20) "Winchip-2A/Winchip-3" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [57]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "58" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(9) "MCYRIXIII" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(15) "CyrixIII/VIA-C3" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [58]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "59" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(8) "MVIAC3_2" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(19) "VIA C3-2 (Nehemiah)" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [59]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "60" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(19) "Generic x86 support" ["name"]=> string(11) "X86_GENERIC" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(141) " Including some tuning for non selected x86 CPUs too. when it has moderate overhead. This is intended for generic distributions kernels. " } [60]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "61" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(11) "X86_CMPXCHG" ["name"]=> string(11) "X86_CMPXCHG" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [61]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "62" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(8) "X86_XADD" ["name"]=> string(8) "X86_XADD" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [62]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "63" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "STRING" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(18) "X86_L1_CACHE_SHIFT" ["value"]=> string(1) "7" ["type"]=> string(6) "string" ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(18) "X86_L1_CACHE_SHIFT" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [63]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "64" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(22) "RWSEM_GENERIC_SPINLOCK" ["name"]=> string(22) "RWSEM_GENERIC_SPINLOCK" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [64]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "65" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(23) "RWSEM_XCHGADD_ALGORITHM" ["name"]=> string(23) "RWSEM_XCHGADD_ALGORITHM" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [65]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "66" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(14) "X86_PPRO_FENCE" ["name"]=> string(14) "X86_PPRO_FENCE" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [66]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "67" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(12) "X86_F00F_BUG" ["name"]=> string(12) "X86_F00F_BUG" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [67]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "68" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(15) "X86_WP_WORKS_OK" ["name"]=> string(15) "X86_WP_WORKS_OK" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [68]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "69" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(10) "X86_INVLPG" ["name"]=> string(10) "X86_INVLPG" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [69]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "70" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(9) "X86_BSWAP" ["name"]=> string(9) "X86_BSWAP" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [70]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "71" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(12) "X86_POPAD_OK" ["name"]=> string(12) "X86_POPAD_OK" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [71]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "72" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(16) "X86_ALIGNMENT_16" ["name"]=> string(16) "X86_ALIGNMENT_16" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [72]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "73" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(13) "X86_GOOD_APIC" ["name"]=> string(13) "X86_GOOD_APIC" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [73]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "74" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(18) "X86_INTEL_USERCOPY" ["name"]=> string(18) "X86_INTEL_USERCOPY" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [74]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "75" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(21) "X86_USE_PPRO_CHECKSUM" ["name"]=> string(21) "X86_USE_PPRO_CHECKSUM" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [75]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "76" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(13) "X86_USE_3DNOW" ["name"]=> string(13) "X86_USE_3DNOW" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [76]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "77" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(11) "X86_OOSTORE" ["name"]=> string(11) "X86_OOSTORE" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [77]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "78" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(21) "Huge TLB Page Support" ["name"]=> string(12) "HUGETLB_PAGE" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(300) " This enables support for huge pages. User space applications can make use of this support with the sys_alloc_hugepages and sys_free_hugepages system calls. If your applications are huge page aware and your processor (Pentium or later for x86) supports this, then say Y here. Otherwise, say N. " } [78]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "79" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(34) "Symmetric multi-processing support" ["name"]=> string(3) "SMP" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(1190) " This enables support for systems with more than one CPU. If you have a system with only one CPU, like most personal computers, say N. If you have a system with more than one CPU, say Y. If you say N here, the kernel will run on single and multiprocessor machines, but will use only one CPU of a multiprocessor machine. If you say Y here, the kernel will run on many, but not all, singleprocessor machines. On a singleprocessor machine, the kernel will run faster if you say N here. Note that if you say Y here and choose architecture "586" or "Pentium" under "Processor family", the kernel will not work on 486 architectures. Similarly, multiprocessor kernels for the "PPro" architecture may not work on all Pentium based boards. People using multiprocessor machines who say Y here should also say Y to "Enhanced Real Time Clock Support", below. The "Advanced Power Management" code will be disabled if you say Y here. See also the , , , and the SMP-HOWTO available at . If you don't know what to do here, say N. " } [79]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "80" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "STRING" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(7) "NR_CPUS" ["value"]=> string(2) "32" ["type"]=> string(6) "string" ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> string(29) "Maximum number of CPUs (2-32)" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [80]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "81" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(18) "Preemptible Kernel" ["name"]=> string(7) "PREEMPT" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(398) " This option reduces the latency of the kernel when reacting to real-time or interactive events by allowing a low priority process to be preempted even if it is in kernel mode executing a system call. This allows applications to run more reliably even when the system is under load. Say Y here if you are building a kernel for a desktop, embedded or real-time system. Say N if you are unsure. " } [81]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "82" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(35) "Local APIC support on uniprocessors" ["name"]=> string(11) "X86_UP_APIC" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(601) " A local APIC (Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller) is an integrated interrupt controller in the CPU. If you have a single-CPU system which has a processor with a local APIC, you can say Y here to enable and use it. If you say Y here even though your machine doesn't have a local APIC, then the kernel will still run with no slowdown at all. The local APIC supports CPU-generated self-interrupts (timer, performance counters), and the NMI watchdog which detects hard lockups. If you have a system with several CPUs, you do not need to say Y here: the local APIC will be used automatically. " } [82]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "83" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(32) "IO-APIC support on uniprocessors" ["name"]=> string(13) "X86_UP_IOAPIC" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(515) " An IO-APIC (I/O Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller) is an SMP-capable replacement for PC-style interrupt controllers. Most SMP systems and a small number of uniprocessor systems have one. If you have a single-CPU system with an IO-APIC, you can say Y here to use it. If you say Y here even though your machine doesn't have an IO-APIC, then the kernel will still run with no slowdown at all. If you have a system with several CPUs, you do not need to say Y here: the IO-APIC will be used automatically. " } [83]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "84" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(14) "X86_LOCAL_APIC" ["name"]=> string(14) "X86_LOCAL_APIC" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [84]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "85" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(11) "X86_IO_APIC" ["name"]=> string(11) "X86_IO_APIC" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [85]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "86" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(7) "X86_TSC" ["name"]=> string(7) "X86_TSC" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [86]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "87" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(23) "Machine Check Exception" ["name"]=> string(7) "X86_MCE" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(806) " Machine Check Exception support allows the processor to notify the kernel if it detects a problem (e.g. overheating, component failure). The action the kernel takes depends on the severity of the problem, ranging from a warning message on the console, to halting the machine. Your processor must be a Pentium or newer to support this - check the flags in /proc/cpuinfo for mce. Note that some older Pentium systems have a design flaw which leads to false MCE events - hence MCE is disabled on all P5 processors, unless explicitly enabled with "mce" as a boot argument. Similarly, if MCE is built in and creates a problem on some new non-standard machine, you can boot with "nomce" to disable it. MCE support simply ignores non-MCE processors like the 386 and 486, so nearly everyone can say Y here. " } [87]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "88" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(64) "Check for non-fatal errors on AMD Athlon/Duron / Intel Pentium 4" ["name"]=> string(16) "X86_MCE_NONFATAL" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(479) " Enabling this feature starts a timer that triggers every 5 seconds which will look at the machine check registers to see if anything happened. Non-fatal problems automatically get corrected (but still logged). Disable this if you don't want to see these messages. Seeing the messages this option prints out may be indicative of dying hardware, or out-of-spec (ie, overclocked) hardware. This option only does something on certain CPUs. (AMD Athlon/Duron and Intel Pentium 4) " } [88]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "89" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(42) "check for P4 thermal throttling interrupt." ["name"]=> string(17) "X86_MCE_P4THERMAL" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(100) " Enabling this feature will cause a message to be printed when the P4 enters thermal throttling. " } [89]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "90" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(22) "Toshiba Laptop support" ["name"]=> string(7) "TOSHIBA" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(8) "tristate" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(494) " This adds a driver to safely access the System Management Mode of the CPU on Toshiba portables with a genuine Toshiba BIOS. It does not work on models with a Phoenix BIOS. The System Management Mode is used to set the BIOS and power saving options on Toshiba portables. For information on utilities to make use of this driver see the Toshiba Linux utilities web site at: . Say Y if you intend to run this kernel on a Toshiba portable. Say N otherwise. " } [90]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "91" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(19) "Dell laptop support" ["name"]=> string(3) "I8K" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(8) "tristate" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(657) " This adds a driver to safely access the System Management Mode of the CPU on the Dell Inspiron 8000. The System Management Mode is used to read cpu temperature and cooling fan status and to control the fans on the I8K portables. This driver has been tested only on the Inspiron 8000 but it may also work with other Dell laptops. You can force loading on other models by passing the parameter `force=1' to the module. Use at your own risk. For information on utilities to make use of this driver see the I8K Linux utilities web site at: Say Y if you intend to run this kernel on a Dell Inspiron 8000. Say N otherwise. " } [91]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "92" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(53) "/dev/cpu/microcode - Intel IA32 CPU microcode support" ["name"]=> string(9) "MICROCODE" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(8) "tristate" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(879) " If you say Y here and also to "/dev file system support" in the 'File systems' section, you will be able to update the microcode on Intel processors in the IA32 family, e.g. Pentium Pro, Pentium II, Pentium III, Pentium 4, Xeon etc. You will obviously need the actual microcode binary data itself which is not shipped with the Linux kernel. For latest news and information on obtaining all the required ingredients for this driver, check: . This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The module will be called microcode. If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read . If you use modprobe or kmod you may also want to add the line 'alias char-major-10-184 microcode' to your /etc/modules.conf file. " } [92]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "93" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(48) "/dev/cpu/*/msr - Model-specific register support" ["name"]=> string(7) "X86_MSR" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(8) "tristate" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(265) " This device gives privileged processes access to the x86 Model-Specific Registers (MSRs). It is a character device with major 202 and minors 0 to 31 for /dev/cpu/0/msr to /dev/cpu/31/msr. MSR accesses are directed to a specific CPU on multi-processor systems. " } [93]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "94" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(42) "/dev/cpu/*/cpuid - CPU information support" ["name"]=> string(9) "X86_CPUID" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(8) "tristate" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(211) " This device gives processes access to the x86 CPUID instruction to be executed on a specific processor. It is a character device with major 203 and minors 0 to 31 for /dev/cpu/0/cpuid to /dev/cpu/31/cpuid. " } [94]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "95" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(65) "BIOS Enhanced Disk Drive calls determine boot disk (EXPERIMENTAL)" ["name"]=> string(3) "EDD" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(8) "tristate" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(320) " Say Y or M here if you want to enable BIOS Enhanced Disk Drive Services real mode BIOS calls to determine which disk BIOS tries boot from. This information is then exported via driverfs. This option is experimental, but believed to be safe, and most disk controller BIOS vendors do not yet implement this feature. " } [95]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "96" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(9) "NOHIGHMEM" ["value"]=> string(1) "2" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(3) "off" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [96]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "97" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(9) "HIGHMEM4G" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(3) "4GB" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [97]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "98" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "OPTION" ["text"]=> NULL ["name"]=> string(10) "HIGHMEM64G" ["value"]=> string(1) "0" ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> string(4) "64GB" ["help_text"]=> NULL } [98]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(2) "99" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(7) "HIGHMEM" ["name"]=> string(7) "HIGHMEM" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [99]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(3) "100" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(7) "X86_PAE" ["name"]=> string(7) "X86_PAE" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [100]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(3) "101" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(30) "Numa Memory Allocation Support" ["name"]=> string(4) "NUMA" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [101]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(3) "102" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(12) "DISCONTIGMEM" ["name"]=> string(12) "DISCONTIGMEM" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [102]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(3) "103" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(22) "HAVE_ARCH_BOOTMEM_NODE" ["name"]=> string(22) "HAVE_ARCH_BOOTMEM_NODE" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [103]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(3) "104" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(42) "Allocate 3rd-level pagetables from highmem" ["name"]=> string(7) "HIGHPTE" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(223) " The VM uses one page table entry for each page of physical memory. For systems with a lot of RAM, this can be wasteful of precious low memory. Setting this option will put user-space page table entries in high memory. " } [104]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(3) "105" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(14) "Math emulation" ["name"]=> string(14) "MATH_EMULATION" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(1109) " Linux can emulate a math coprocessor (used for floating point operations) if you don't have one. 486DX and Pentium processors have a math coprocessor built in, 486SX and 386 do not, unless you added a 487DX or 387, respectively. (The messages during boot time can give you some hints here ["man dmesg"].) Everyone needs either a coprocessor or this emulation. If you don't have a math coprocessor, you need to say Y here; if you say Y here even though you have a coprocessor, the coprocessor will be used nevertheless. (This behavior can be changed with the kernel command line option "no387", which comes handy if your coprocessor is broken. Try "man bootparam" or see the documentation of your boot loader (lilo or loadlin) about how to pass options to the kernel at boot time.) This means that it is a good idea to say Y here if you intend to use this kernel on different machines. More information about the internals of the Linux math coprocessor emulation can be found in . If you are not sure, say Y; apart from resulting in a 66 KB bigger kernel, it won't hurt. " } [105]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(3) "106" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(41) "MTRR (Memory Type Range Register) support" ["name"]=> string(4) "MTRR" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(1498) " On Intel P6 family processors (Pentium Pro, Pentium II and later) the Memory Type Range Registers (MTRRs) may be used to control processor access to memory ranges. This is most useful if you have a video (VGA) card on a PCI or AGP bus. Enabling write-combining allows bus write transfers to be combined into a larger transfer before bursting over the PCI/AGP bus. This can increase performance of image write operations 2.5 times or more. Saying Y here creates a /proc/mtrr file which may be used to manipulate your processor's MTRRs. Typically the X server should use this. This code has a reasonably generic interface so that similar control registers on other processors can be easily supported as well: The Cyrix 6x86, 6x86MX and M II processors have Address Range Registers (ARRs) which provide a similar functionality to MTRRs. For these, the ARRs are used to emulate the MTRRs. The AMD K6-2 (stepping 8 and above) and K6-3 processors have two MTRRs. The Centaur C6 (WinChip) has 8 MCRs, allowing write-combining. All of these processors are supported by this code and it makes sense to say Y here if you have one of them. Saying Y here also fixes a problem with buggy SMP BIOSes which only set the MTRRs for the boot CPU and not for the secondary CPUs. This can lead to all sorts of problems, so it's good to say Y here. You can safely say Y even if your machine doesn't have MTRRs, you'll just add about 9 KB to your kernel. See for more information. " } [106]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(3) "107" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(13) "HAVE_DEC_LOCK" ["name"]=> string(13) "HAVE_DEC_LOCK" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [107]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(3) "108" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(12) "BOOT_IOREMAP" ["name"]=> string(12) "BOOT_IOREMAP" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(5) "false" ["help"]=> string(1) "0" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [108]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(3) "109" ["entry_type"]=> string(4) "MENU" ["text"]=> string(36) "Power management options (ACPI, APM)" ["name"]=> NULL ["value"]=> NULL ["type"]=> NULL ["prompt"]=> NULL ["help"]=> NULL ["level"]=> string(1) "0" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> NULL } [109]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(3) "110" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(24) "Power Management support" ["name"]=> string(2) "PM" ["value"]=> string(1) "y" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(1) "5" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(774) " "Power Management" means that parts of your computer are shut off or put into a power conserving "sleep" mode if they are not being used. There are two competing standards for doing this: APM and ACPI. If you want to use either one, say Y here and then also to the requisite support below. Power Management is most important for battery powered laptop computers; if you have a laptop, check out the Linux Laptop home page on the WWW at and the Battery Powered Linux mini-HOWTO, available from . Note that, even if you say N here, Linux on the x86 architecture will issue the hlt instruction if nothing is to be done, thereby sending the processor to sleep and saving power. " } [110]=> array(11) { ["entry_id"]=> string(3) "111" ["entry_type"]=> string(6) "SYMBOL" ["text"]=> string(31) "Software Suspend (EXPERIMENTAL)" ["name"]=> string(16) "SOFTWARE_SUSPEND" ["value"]=> string(1) "n" ["type"]=> string(4) "bool" ["prompt"]=> string(4) "true" ["help"]=> string(1) "1" ["level"]=> string(2) "10" ["content"]=> NULL ["help_text"]=> string(1103) " Enable the possibilty of suspendig machine. It doesn't need APM. You may suspend your machine by 'swsusp' or 'shutdown -z